Micklegate and Priory Street

The site on which the Priory Street Centre stands lies within what was the Roman Colonia fort of Eboracum, and in the southwest portion of the medieval town of York. The site was once part of a much larger seven-acre monastery and Benedictine priory, the Holy Trinity Church to the rear of the Priory Street Centre on Micklegate is all that remains of the priory.

The Priory Street Centre

Opened in 1857, the Priory Street School was originally part of the Assembly of God Church – now the Q Church. Pupil numbers rose swiftly, and by 1870 there was said to be 600 boys, girls and infants along with a teacher’s residence.

The school was extended in 1905 and by 1932 split into two departments: senior mixed and junior mixed. In addition to the normal curriculum, composition, book-keeping, algebra, Euclid, mensuration, land surveying, advanced drawing, and ornamental penmanship classes were also taught. In 1936 only the senior department was left, remaining under Methodist management until it was closed in 1948.

 

Today – a conference centre making a difference…

The Priory Street Centre today is proud to be part of York Centre for Voluntary Action (affectionately known as York CVS). York CVS is an independent charity supporting and championing York’s voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector to make positive change, challenge issues and grow new ideas for the future in order to strengthen communities.

Profits from the conference centre go towards supporting York CVS to deliver their vital work in the city. So, your booking really does make a difference! Find out more about York CVS on their website.

Micklegate

Micklegate was once the main entry point to the city and the Priory, which would have been the first port of call for travellers and pilgrims. It was via Micklegate Bar that Henry VII arrived to the town of York first in 1486, and again in July 1487 accompanied by a thousand noblemen to quash a plot to depose him.

War Memorial

The Priory Street Centre is home to a bronze plaque, sitting proudly in the York CVS office, commemorating those from the school that lost their lives in the first world war.

WW1 Plaque